Reclaiming the Latina tag

A blog dedicated to reclaiming the Latina tag. Because we don't belong to your hypersexualization and fetishization.

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Revolutionary Latina:
Lolita Lebrón (November 19, 1919 – August 1, 2010) was a militant leftist Puerto Rican independence leader. Lebrón’s anti-imperialist beliefs led her to join the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, where throughout the years she held high-ranking posts such as secretary, vice-president, and executive delegate of the New York delegation. Aside from her revolutionary socialist ideals, Lebrón was also a noted feminist who fought for women’s right to participate in politics and have general freedom in society. Despite her active participation in protest, Lebrón’s actions weren’t truly noted by the mainstream until 1953.  Acting on her revolutionary principals and anti-imperialist ideals for an independent Puerto Rico, on March 1, 1953  Lolita Lebrón, accompanied by other members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, entered the United States House of Representatives and opened fire with semi-automatic handguns.  Five lawmakers were injured in the attack and Lebrón and her companions were arrested. Upon being arrested, Lebrón yelled “I did not come to kill anyone, I came to die for Puerto Rico!”. While she only shot at the ceiling, Lolita Lebrób was found guilty of attempted murder. After 25 years of incarceration, Lebrón was finally released in 1979 by a pardon and returned to her homeland of Puerto Rico. Throughout the years Lolita continued her involvement in pro-independence activities.  In the 2000 Labrón said “I had the honor of leading the act against the U.S. Congress on March 1, 1954, when we demanded freedom for Puerto Rico and we told the world that we are an invaded nation, occupied and abused by the United States of America…”.
In 2010 Labrón passed away at the age of 91. Despite being demonized by the United States as a terrorist, Lolita Lebrón is now recognized as a leading influence inside and outside Puerto Rico as a revolutionary and feminist symbol.

Revolutionary Latina:

Lolita Lebrón (November 19, 1919 – August 1, 2010) was a militant leftist Puerto Rican independence leader. Lebrón’s anti-imperialist beliefs led her to join the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, where throughout the years she held high-ranking posts such as secretary, vice-president, and executive delegate of the New York delegation. Aside from her revolutionary socialist ideals, Lebrón was also a noted feminist who fought for women’s right to participate in politics and have general freedom in society. Despite her active participation in protest, Lebrón’s actions weren’t truly noted by the mainstream until 1953.  Acting on her revolutionary principals and anti-imperialist ideals for an independent Puerto Rico, on March 1, 1953  Lolita Lebrón, accompanied by other members of the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party, entered the United States House of Representatives and opened fire with semi-automatic handguns.  Five lawmakers were injured in the attack and Lebrón and her companions were arrested. Upon being arrested, Lebrón yelled “I did not come to kill anyone, I came to die for Puerto Rico!”. While she only shot at the ceiling, Lolita Lebrób was found guilty of attempted murder. After 25 years of incarceration, Lebrón was finally released in 1979 by a pardon and returned to her homeland of Puerto Rico. Throughout the years Lolita continued her involvement in pro-independence activities.  In the 2000 Labrón said “I had the honor of leading the act against the U.S. Congress on March 1, 1954, when we demanded freedom for Puerto Rico and we told the world that we are an invaded nation, occupied and abused by the United States of America…”.

In 2010 Labrón passed away at the age of 91. Despite being demonized by the United States as a terrorist, Lolita Lebrón is now recognized as a leading influence inside and outside Puerto Rico as a revolutionary and feminist symbol.

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