Reclaiming the Latina tag

A blog dedicated to reclaiming the Latina tag. Because we don't belong to your hypersexualization and fetishization.

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Contributing Latinas
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Claribel Alegría has been a formidable champion for Central America, continuing the region’s tradition of revolutionary poetry. Born in Nicaragua to Salvadoran parents forced into exile during her infancy for their human rights work, and herself exiled from El Salvador for her powerful poetic dissent, Alegría has unflaggingly spoken for justice and liberty in each of 40 books of poetry, testimony, fiction, and nonfiction. In the poems, her talent, courage, and commitment to freedom emerge most strongly. She’s heavily influenced by the revolutionary struggles of the Central American peoples against the dictatorships of the middle and later parts of the twentieth century and was closely associated with the Sandinista movement in Nicaragua. After the overthrow of the Somoza regime, she returned to that country in 1985 to help in the reconstruction process. In her assessment of the poet, Marjorie Agosín has written of the ‘multifaceted work of Alegría, from her testimony to her verse… In this woman’s furious, fiery, tender and lovesick words, the marginalized, the indigenous recuperate spaces, resuscitate their dead, and celebrate life by defying death.’ While many of the early poems focus on the revolutionary conflict, Alegría has also written numerous love poems, as well as novels and children’s stories.
Claribel Alegría has been a formidable champion for Central America, continuing the region’s tradition of revolutionary poetry. Born in Nicaragua to Salvadoran parents forced into exile during her infancy for their human rights work, and herself exiled from El Salvador for her powerful poetic dissent, Alegría has unflaggingly spoken for justice and liberty in each of 40 books of poetry, testimony, fiction, and nonfiction. In the poems, her talent, courage, and commitment to freedom emerge most strongly. She’s heavily influenced by the revolutionary struggles of the Central American peoples against the dictatorships of the middle and later parts of the twentieth century and was closely associated with the Sandinista movement in Nicaragua. After the overthrow of the Somoza regime, she returned to that country in 1985 to help in the reconstruction process. In her assessment of the poet, Marjorie Agosín has written of the ‘multifaceted work of Alegría, from her testimony to her verse… In this woman’s furious, fiery, tender and lovesick words, the marginalized, the indigenous recuperate spaces, resuscitate their dead, and celebrate life by defying death.’ While many of the early poems focus on the revolutionary conflict, Alegría has also written numerous love poems, as well as novels and children’s stories.
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